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Protected: Kiteboarder Bar Technique

Control Bar Technique Kite Bar setup and Kiteboarder Bar Technique needs your respect and undivided attention. Preparing to launch is a serious time, and can make or break your session. There are many basic mistakes that people make, that can easily be corrected. Here is a checklist of the Good and the Bad, so you know “What to do, and What Not To Do”!! Prepare to launch Preparing to launch is a serious time where you get to check over all your gear especially your control bar. The success of your launch and your session depends on your control bar setup and handling. There are many basic mistakes that can be avoided if you know the correct Kiteboarder Bar Technique. Sloppy Kiteboarder Bar Technique leads to accidents and loss of kite control. Do not rush the pre-flight check, it…

Protected: Kiteboarder Jump Zone

  Kiteboarder Jump Zone When you want to jump you must look to see if the area is clear of people and obstacles. We move in four dimensions, left/right upwind/downwind, high/low, and time. You should always share the water with other kiters, and give way to others when jumping. Keep in mind how much room…

Protected: Kiteboarder’s Blind Spot

  Kiteboarder’s Blind Spot Learning to deal with traffic on the water is not just about knowing the ROW rules. You should also take into account that kiteboarders have a large blind spot. If you ride in someone’s blind spot they cannot see you and you could become involved in an accident. More than meets the eye: Most collisions occur because someone wasn’t looking where they were going. Beginners look at the kite, and intermediates look where they want to go, and surfers look at the waves. How often when you are riding do you look behind you? The Blind Spots: Behind and upwind of every kiteboarder is a large blind spot where they cannot see and where they do not normally look. This is made worse by kiters using helmets which may reduce their peripheral awareness. Also salt spray…

Maui Ocean Safety

  Maui Ocean Safety – BE BEACH SMART SECURITY: Theft is a big problem at all beaches and parks in Hawaii. Thieves will break windows to get into cars. Always lock your car, do not take valuables to the beach, do not lose your car key in the ocean, do not lock your keys is your car. I would not recommend staying around any beaches after sunset. There are a few thug types that hang out there that will take advantage of isolated or solitary people. Numerous assaults have happened at beach parks to unsuspecting tourists. Even if a local appears friendly and offers to sell you some “weed” (Called “pakalolo” in Hawaiian) in the privacy of the bushes, Don’t go with them. SUN SMART: Most visitors do not realize how strong the sun is in Hawaii. Many people will…

Beaufort Wind Scale

Beaufort Wind Scale   Developed in 1806 by Sir Francis Beaufort of England   The Beaufort Scale was created to standardize wind strength observations. Eventually adopted by the Royal Navy in 1830 it became the standard. With slight variations over the years, the scale is still used in some countries. Nowadays there are many more instruments and wind gauges available. However the Beaufort Scale is still the best way to estimate the wind speed based purely on visual observations of the sea state. In some countries, the scale goes beyond 12, and has classifications from 13-17, which are for special situations like typhoons (hurricanes). Here is the most common version of the Beaufort Scale. Force Wind (Knots) Wind (mph) WMO Classification Appearance of Wind Effects On the Water On Land 0 Less than 1 Less than 1 Calm Sea surface…

Coral Reef Protection

      Coral Reef Protection E malama o ke kai (to care for the ocean) As an olelo noeau (Hawaiian proverb) states, “Malama i ke kai, a malama ke kai ia oe!” which means care for the ocean and the ocean will care for you. The Hawaiian word “Malama” (mah-lah-mah), means to take care of, tend, attend, care for, preserve, protect, beware, save, maintain. Malama is often heard in reference to taking care of Hawaii’s natural resources- Malama ka ‘āina. Coral Reef Protection and Ocean Etiquette When engaging in the marine environment we should remember that the ocean and near shore reefs are home to a multitude of species. The biology of the coral reef is an amazing interaction of elemental forces and the balance between all the species that visit and inhabit the reef. Humans have a role…

How to Read a Weather Map

HOW TO READ A WEATHER MAP by David Dorn “Weather Maps may seem confusing when you first see them. But you can learn the basics easily. The information they contain helps us to understand the current weather picture and to make future weather predictions. Just looking out your window only tells you the immediate weather in your local spot, but it cannot tell you what changes to expect like the coming of a storm, or the possibility of surf arriving in a few days. Weather Maps look at a large area and show the large weather systems that are moving toward your area. Come with me as we take a look at How to read a weather map”. Aloha, David Dorn Weather maps contain information about atmospheric pressure, fronts, storms, and wind speeds and wind direction. The areas of different…

How to Fly a Trainer Kite

    HOW TO FLY A KITE  “The basics of kite flying do not need to be complicated. With some basic equipment, some open space, and a little breeze you can master the fundamental flying skills in an afternoon. Using the trainer kite is a fun and relatively safe way to learn about the wind, and to learn the basic kite steering reflexes. Remember that mother nature is the boss out there, and you should always treat the elements and your environment with respect. Do not underestimate the power of the wind either. Even the small trainer kites can overwhelm kids and novices, so we recommend parental supervision for young kids. And remember that it is always more fun to fly with a buddy. Lets take a look at How to fly a Kite”. Aloha, David Dorn How-to use…

How to SUP Standup Paddle Surf

  How to Standup Paddle Surf – SUP by David Dorn. Standup PADDLE Surfing is a modern revival of an older surfing style from EARLY PART OF THE  last century. The original INSPIRATION for this sport may have come from fishermen standing in their canoes and catching waves. This skill has now evolved into the sport we now know as Standup paddle boarding. Boards: Standup Boards are wider than regular surfboards, and usually have more volume. This adds to their stability at slow speeds. This is known a static stability. The greater the static stability the easier the board is to learn on. This simply put means bigger is better. When learning How to SUP Standup Paddle Surf, larger riders will want larger boards. Longer is not always more stable. Mostly it is the width that aids initial…

How Waves are Made

How Waves are Made “Understanding the elemental forces that create our ocean waves, and the processes that deliver the surf to our beaches will help you to better appreciate the different surf conditions that exist, and to better participate in ocean surfing sports. Wind, weather, tides, and land-forms all have their effect on the types of wave that we experience at the shoreline. Lets take a look at the basics of How waves are Made”. Aloha, David Dorn. Ocean Waves Formation: Ocean waves are usually formed by a distant wind. Usually storms generate strong winds that act on the ocean’s surface for several days. The strength of the wind, and the duration it blows have a factor on how the resulting waves will be. The area which the wind affects the surface is called the fetch. The larger the fetch,…

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